How to Fill Out a Score Sheet
 
1. Division/Level – Please circle the division level, i.e. mite, squirt, etc.
2. Tier I/Tier II – Circle the appropriate level, i.e. AA, A1, GRHL, etc.
3. Enter the League Game ID Number
a.
The league game ID can be found on your schedule on the MO Hockey web site.
b.
Go to www.mohockey.org
c.
Click on Youth division
d.
Click on schedule
e.
Click on your division (middle column) For example, Bantam A1
f.
This will give you the master schedule for all Bantam A1 games
g.
Locate your game by the date.
h.
On the left hand side there will be a number beginning with a YD or GR
i.
That is your league game id. (YD= Travel, GR= GRHL)
j.
Please use the prefix of YD or GR with the number.
 
4. Enter the name of the Home Team.
 
5. Enter the name of the Visitor Team
 
6. Coaching Staff Information
a.
Enter the names of the coaches
b.
CEP# (Coaching Card Number)
c.
Level – will be a 1, 2, 3, or 4. (Can be found on the coaching card)
d.
Year attained (also found on the coaching card)
e.
This information is needed for every game. It would be a good idea to keep this information to be used on the next game.
f.
Have the head coach sign the scoresheet prior to the beginning of the game. This verifies the roster and allows him the opportunity to list any suspended players or team officials.
 
7. Scoring by Period Box
a.
List the number of goals per period
b.
Total the number to get the end of the game score
 
8. Visiting/Home Team Scoring
a.
P= period goal scored (1st, 2nd, 3rd, OT)
b.
Time = Check the scoreboard and write down the time shown.
c.
G = Player number who scored
d.
A = 1st A is the player number who assisted first
e.
A = 2nd A is the player number who assisted first
f.
It is helpful but not necessary to mark a goal as “sh” (short-handed) or “pp” (power play) for your statistician.
g.
NOTE #1: The referee should give you this information. For example the referee will say goal by #10 from #2 and #44. You will put #10 in the G column, #2, in the 1st A column, and #44 in the second A column.
h.
NOTE #2: Check that the players who have scored or assisted are actually listed on the score sheet. If they are not listed let the referee know.
i.
NOTE#3: Note any goal that was scored while the goaltender was off of the ice (open-net goals).
 
9. Visiting/Home Penalties Boxes
a.
Per = period penalty received, i.e. 1, 2, 3, or OT
b.
NO = Number of player receiving the penalty
c.
Offense = reason for the penalty. The referee will give this information to you. (For example - #10 White, tripping)
d.
MIN = Number of minutes of penalty. This will usually be 2 but it could be 5 or 10. The referee will tell you how many minutes.
e.
Off = Check the scoreboard and write down the time the penalty was given.
f.
Start = Will usually be the same as the time off. The only time this will not be the case is when there are already two penalties on the clock. This is not a real important stat so if you don’t know this one just leave it blank.
g.
ON = this is the time the player is allowed to leave the box. If there was no goal scored the time would be 2 minutes later than the time off. If a goal is scored, check the score board for the time of the goal and enter this time as the on time. (This is important for stat purposes to determine if a power play goal has occurred.)
h.
NOTE #1: Multiple penalties go on multiple lines (e.g. A minor and misconduct for checking from behind is two penalties and must be recorded as such). If there are more penalties than will fit on the score sheet, use a second score sheet.
i.
NOTE #2: Penalty shots must be recorded in the penalty record. A penalty shot counts towards the team’s 15 penalties in a game, regardless of whether a goal is scored or not. Record the time, player taking the shot, and the result of the shot.
j.
NOTE #3: Immediately inform the referee of any player that has received 5 penalties in the game (remember, penalties like checking from behind counts as two penalties). After the game, inform the referee whether either team received a total of 15 penalties in the game.
 
10. Goalkeepers Saves
a.
This is the number of shots that did not go into the net.
b.
The goalkeepers are sort of the forgotten players when it comes to stats. An easy way to keep saves is to make a hash mark on the side of the score sheet or on a scrap piece of paper for every save. Draw a line under the last save each period. At the end of the game add them up and place them in the correct box.
c.
Record the period and time that each goaltender entered the game after the game has started.
 
11. Game Start Time
a.
This is the time the game begins. Check the wall clock or your watch.
 
12. Finish Time
a.
This is the time the game ends. This is real important for games that are unfinished. Check the wall clock or your watch (the wall clock is prefe2rable if available).
 
13. Time Outs
a.
If a team takes a time out, record which team took the timeout, the period, and time the time out was taken on the bottom of the score sheet.
 
14. Official Scorer
a.
Print your name legibly.
 
Helpful Hints
1.
Have a scrap piece of paper at the scorekeeper’s table to write down the information given to you by the referee. You can then enter the information on the score sheet after play has resumed and things are not hurried. This paper can also be used to keep saves for the goalkeepers.
2.
If you know you are going to keep score for a game, ask your coach/manager for the score sheet in advance. You can then have all the header information filled in before the game begins.
3.
Be sure to ask your coach if you have any suspended players and be sure that you enter that name in the SUSP box at the end of the roster section of the score sheet.